Archive for the 'Political Marketing' Category

Obama aides said they would post YouTube videos of economic experts to communicate and rally support for the administration’s economic proposals. Obama advisers had found during the campaign that using experts, even those not widely known, instead of the usual political pundits in videos was far more effective in gaining support.

Not surprising that industry experts are more effective. I don’t know why talk shows keep interviewing political operatives. You know exactly what they are going to say.

Source: New York Times

Big 3 automakers CEOs got a spanking a little while ago when they took their private jets to D.C. Now they’re scrambling to defend themselves and patch up their poor PR. So theyre turning to the web big time to make their case. Working?
You be the judge.

Ford CEO presents plan
YouTube Preview Image

 

Chrysler created a channel on Youtube
http://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=grab+democracy&search_type=&aq=f

Enter bailout or ford bailout in google and you get an adwords ad leading you to Ford’s business plan on scribd
http://www.scribd.com/search?query=ford+business+plan&x=23&y=14

 

GM puts up a minisite to defend itself. Reads quite a bit like one of those advocacy advertorials in the NY Times. Not gonna work
www.GMfactsandfiction.com

 

The Internet proved to be an invaluable tool for the Obama campaign. First indications are that the Obama presidency will continue to make unprecedented use of digital communications as both a governing tool and a way to foster better interaction between the people and government.

The Obama campaign posted behind the scenes photos on photo-sharing site Flickr of Obama, his family, and friends as they waited for election results . The pictures generated so much traffic that Flickr became briefly overloaded.

In addition, Obama’s transition team website is soliciting ideas for solving the country’s problems. Check it out at  the Open Government section at change.gov .

Obama’s campaign will be studied for years to come by both political and business marketers. His use of digital marketing for building and maintaining support was exceptional.

One small example.  If you contributed to Obama’s campaign you received an email from  Obama on election night, saying “I’m on my way over to Grant Park in Chicago.  Just want to thank you for your generous support.”  Something like that went out to millions of supporters.

Nice touch.

In my recent interview in AWAI’s copywriting publication, Monthly Copywriting Genius, I talked about the importance of creating a theme/concept for your marketing. It’s certainly no different in political campaigns – only the stakes are a lot bigger!

When Obama seized the “change” theme in Iowa, the other Dems tried to take it from him. In the following debate, the word “change” was repeated by the Democratic candidates at least 50 times. But they couldn’t take it away. Obama now owned it.

But the Republicans with Sarah Palin have done something remarkable. They are challenging Obama for the change theme. Obama is fighting back.

“When John McCain gets up there with Sarah Palin and says, `We’re for change,’ … what are they talking about?” Obama said recently, arguing that they aren’t offering different ideas from President Bush and they are just trying to steal his campaign theme because it seemed to be working.

“It was just like a month ago they were all saying, `Oh, it’s experience, experience, experience.’ Then they chose Palin and they started talking about change, change, change,” he said.

In political campaigns, the right theme can make or break a presidential bid. Change is the right theme. Now let’s see who will own it.

 

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